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Mariana CandidoAn African Slaving Port and the Atlantic World: Benguela and its Hinterland

Cambridge University Press, 2013

by Jim Lance on April 17, 2015

Mariana Candido

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Mariana Candido’s book An African Slaving Port and the Atlantic World. Benguela and its Hinterland (Cambridge University Press, 2013) is a powerful and moving exploration of the history and development of the port of Benguela. Founded by the Portuguese in the early seventeenth century, Benguela, located on the central coast of present-day Angola, was the third largest port of slave embarkation on the coast of Africa. In discussing the impact of the trans-Atlantic slave trade on African societies, Candido looks at the formation of new elites, the collapse of old states, and the emergence of new ones. Her book offers a new perspective on the importance of the South Atlantic as a space for the circulation of people, ideas, and crops. But what makes this book truly distinctive is how Candido digs beneath the surface of her evidence to give readers a sense of the lived experiences and feelings of all involved in the trade: the unfortunate victims and those who benefited from the violent capture and selling of human beings. As historian John Thornton observes, Candido’s book “will be a starting point for studies of the region for years to come.”

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Kirt von DaackeFreedom Has a Face: Race, Identity, and Community in Jefferson’s Virginia

April 16, 2015

In this podcast I talk to Kirt von Daacke about his 2012 work, Freedom Has a Face: Race, Identity, and Community in Jefferson's Virginia (University of Virginia Press, 2012). Professor von Daacke is Associate Professor of History and Assistant Dean in the College of Arts and Sciences at the University of Virginia. In this interview a […]

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Paula T. ConnollySlavery in American Children’s Literature, 1790-2010

March 26, 2015

The "peculiar institution" upon which the US nation was founded is still rich for examination.  Perhaps this is why it is a subject to which 21st century authors continue to return.   In this exploration of slavery, Paula T. Connolly, author of Slavery in American Children's Literature 1790 – 2010 (University of Iowa, 2013), provides an expansive […]

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Carolyn FinneyBlack Faces, White Spaces: Reimagining the Relationship of African Americans to the Great Outdoors

March 17, 2015

Geographer Carolyn Finney wrote Black Faces, White Spaces: Reimagining the Relationship of African Americans to the Great Outdoors (University of North Carolina Press, 2014), out of a frustration with the dominant environmental discourse that, she asserts, doesn't fully take into consideration the perspectives and interests of African Americans. Finney takes care to recognize the multiplicity of African […]

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Bill T. JonesStory/Time: The Life of An Idea

March 17, 2015

When does a dance become a book? How does choreography lend itself to the page? What discontents exist in theorizing performance that are best explored through the written word? And how does one distill the hours of embodied practice into 100 or so pages of a tightly packaged and beautifully rendered text? It was the […]

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Doug McAdam and Karina Kloos Deeply Divided: Racial Politics and Social Movements in Postwar America

March 15, 2015

Doug McAdam and Karina Kloos are the authors of Deeply Divided: Racial Politics and Social Movements in Postwar America (Oxford University Press, 2014). McAdam is The Ray Lyman Wilbur Professor of Sociology at Stanford University and the former Director of the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences. Kloos is a scholar of political […]

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David Krugler1919, The Year of Racial Violence: How African Americans Fought Back

February 13, 2015

In 1919, The Year of Racial Violence: How African Americans Fought Back (Cambridge University Press, 2014), David Krugler chronicles the origins and development of ten major race riots that took place in the United States during that year. Although sustained, anti-black violence both predates and succeeds the year under examination,  1919 distinguishes itself by the sheer […]

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Gavin WrightSharing the Prize: The Economics of the Civil Rights Revolution in the American South

February 13, 2015

[Cross-posted from New Books in History]  Americans rightly think of the civil rights legislation of 1964 and '65 as a social and legal revolution. In Sharing the Prize: The Economics of the Civil Rights Revolution in the American South (Harvard University Press, 2013), Gavin Wright argues that it was an economic one, too. In clear and tightly organized prose, the […]

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Kenneth PrewittWhat Is Your Race?: The Census and Our Flawed Efforts to Classify Americans

January 13, 2015

[Cross-posted from New Books in Education] The US Census has been an important American institution for over 220 years. Since 1790, the US population has been counted and compiled, important figures when tabulating representation and electoral votes. The Census has also captured the racial make-up of the US and has become a powerful public policy tool […]

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Randy J. SparksWhere the Negroes Are Masters: An African Port in the Era of the Slave Trade

January 1, 2015

[Cross-posted from New Books in American Studies] A kind of biography of the town of Annamaboe, a major slave trading port on Africa's Gold Coast, Randy J. Sparks's book Where the Negroes Are Masters: An African Port in the Era of the Slave Trade (Harvard University Press, 2014) focuses on the African women and men who were the crucial middle […]

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